You’re reading all articles tagged 'typography'

Bat Labels

26 Jan 2016

The original Batman movie and TV series with Adam West was superb. Not only a glorious technicolour 60s camp fest, with classic scenes such as “Some days you just can’t get rid of a bomb”, but everything had labels.

BIG obvious labels.

“Lets try the Anti-Crime Computer” one of the characters would say, and there, in its large labelled glory was the very device. The over-obviousness of it all made me chuckle a lot, which the children would take as meaning “I love big signs, and that includes road signs”.

Now, there is the Tumblr blog Bat Labels which has set the task of collecting all of these together. There are many great examples, but surely the “Death Bee Hive Trip Wire” is one of the best…


History by Typotheque

09 Sep 2009

TPTQ_History_2

On the same day that the latest font catalogue from Netherlands foundry Typotheque arrives in the post, I discover the exciting news that they’re about to launch their own Web Font service. As far as I’m aware, this is the first foundry to setup their own web distribution – rather than using a 3rd party such as Typekit. It feels like the flood gates of web fonts are suddenly about to open!

What also peaked my interest, was the incredible piece of work that is Typotheque’s History.

TPTQ_History

Based on a skeleton of Roman inscriptional capitals, History includes ’21 layers inspired by the evolution of typography’. These layers are designed to be combined, which means that you build up your own style of typeface using layers of serifs, swashes and other decorations. It can be a chunky slab serif, or a light sans with delicate swashes, while maintaing the same strong typographic base:

history_01

TPTQ_History_6

Mixing these layers can be done with their own ‘History Remixer’, but for web it requires a bit of javascript tomfoolery. In all, it’s an outstanding piece of work, and I’m tempted to swap allegiance from Underground Pro.


Skute

06 May 2009

f0010_blog.jpg

Youworkforthem have released a free version of their handset Skute Pro font, that’s crying out to be used on a record cover (such as they are these days).

A.M. Cassandre produced the typeface Bifur for Peignot in 1929. Bifur broke from rigid typographic forms by combining Art Deco principles of obsessive geometry with the line and stroke of letter forms. Skute picks up Cassandre’s spirit and carries it onward in YWFT hand set fashion. And we are happy to give it out to you. Yep, that’s right, we’re giving Skute to you for your own personal use! Should you need to use Skute for a commercial project or want more letters, buy the enhanced Pro version, Skute Pro.


Harry Potter and the Order of Typography

18 Nov 2007

After seeing Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix my lasting impression of the film was the gorgeous attention to detail to type style. From Daily Prophets to Weasly products, the loving care with which typefaces where chosen or drawn is to be praised. Rather than fall back on clichéd serif faces, chunky, slightly distressed, sans-serifs and slab serifs are used to give the film a unique feel. So when the DVD finally arrived last week, I couldn’t wait to take some screengrabs:

(If the slideshow doesn’t appear, you view the Original set on Flickr)

Uses FlickrShow

I’m not 100%, but I reckon that they’re using a mixture of Champion Gothic (sans-serif) and Ziggurat (serif), both by Hoefler and Frere Jones

Also, thanks the Kottke for pointing me to this article on Design Observer, also talking about the Harry Potter visuals.


Branding with Arial

06 Oct 2005

Many before me have expressed their feelings about Arial, and I’m sure you’re all sick of hearing how it’s a badly made derivative of Helvetica and Grotesque. You all know that to use Arial in print, means that you may as well go the whole hog and use Comic Sans.

However, over the last 4 years I have come across too many ‘branding guidelines’ where the company’s typeface specified has been Arial. Not by CEO’s or administration staff, but by the “creatives” that the company hired! In some cases, it’s been respected, supposedly experienced branding specialists.

Arial is the new company font!

There can be only one reason for this, Arial’s ubiquity is seen as an advantage. Why pay for a new typeface, when everyone has got a copy?! No need to install either! It amazes me that designers make such decisions, but it has happened more time than I’d like to remember.

Aside from the usual arguments, my main reasons for not using Arial in company branding are:

  1. Its ubiquity is its downfall. Its bloody everywhere. Go to the bother of creating print material using Arial, and it will look like something your dad printed out from his PC. (For some charities, this is a positive boon though. If it looks as if you’re spending too much money on the magazine, regular givers will take their money elsewhere! Seriously.)
  2. With no proper italics, the oblique version of the font has to be slanted. Not a a true italic, as this article shows. Even uglier!
  3. As a web font is where Arial works best, not in print, and certainly not as the chuffin’ branding.

So how do we turn this around? For some clients (Charities spring to mind immediately) cost is the major factor. We need a well designed typeface family, containing the 4 basics – Roman to Bold Oblique, thats very economical to buy in either small or large quantities. Do you have any suggestions that fit the bill?


A list of typography things

15 Jul 2005

Happy Birthday Erik!

30 May 2004

I see in my handy Typophile iCal subscription, that today is Erik Spiekermann’s birthday. Amongst many others, Erik is famous for giving the world that sophisticated beauty that is Meta! Cheers Erik!


Instagram Hickstagram

  • 14 Jul 2018

    Stopping for a breather - hot day for hills

  • 13 Jul 2018

  • 09 Jul 2018

    Recent garden addition: Stargazer Lillies

  • 07 Jul 2018

    Well… we missed quite a few key acts, but have made it here before Interpol starts at least!

  • 07 Jul 2018

    On our way to BST in Hyde Park. Or… not 😞

  • 06 Jul 2018

    My favourites from this years On Form Sculpture exhibition. The whale was my absolute favourite, but was already sold (which is fine as I don’t have a spare £11,000)

  • 01 Jul 2018

  • 01 Jul 2018

    Not quite in height order. Sort it out

  • 01 Jul 2018

    Filth.

  • 30 Jun 2018

    Agapanthus about to burst forth

Contact us

Call Jon on +44 (0)7917 391536, email or tweet @hicksdesign.

Alternatively, pop in for tea and cake at the studio…

Hicks
Wenrisc House
Meadow Court
Witney, OX28 6ER
United Kingdom